#GenYChat Topic: 8/8/12 Strengths and Weaknesses – Can You Be Too Proud or Too Humble?

“Where your talents and the needs of the world cross lies your calling.” ~ Aristotle

 

Questions

Q1. (It’s a surprise!) #GenYChat

Q2. What should a person come in knowing, what’s acceptable to learn on the job?  #GenYChat

Q3. If you don’t get recognized for what you’re good at, how do you know you’re good at it? #GenYChat

Q4.On Undercover Boss the CEO’s are often unskilled at the frontline jobs. Why? #GenYChat

Q5. If learning from failure is so great, why do we only list successes on resumes? #GenYChat

Q6. Is it ever appropriate to negate your strengths to make others feel stronger? #GenYChat

Q7. What strengths are common to every great hire? #GenYChat

Q8. What weaknesses are common to every coachable hire? #GenYChat

Q9. Who challenged you to conquer your weaknesses (be as vague as you’d like)? #GenYChat

Q10. How can you motivate a person who is afraid of anything that doesn’t come easily to them? #GenYChat

 

How to Participate in #GenYChat on Twitter

If you haven’t participated in the chat before, but have insights to share, please do the following to participate:

If using Twitter.com:

  1. Type “#genychat” into the search field
  2. Click “All” on the search results page
  3. Reply and ReTweet but add “#genychat” onto your tweets in order for everyone participating to see your tweets

If using TweetChat:

  1. Sign in through OAuth. (note: Please read this information about using  OAuth to give third party applications access to your account)
  2. Type “genychat” into the search field (The “#” is already provided)
  3. Click Go
  4. Reply and ReTweet. TweetChat puts the hashtag in for you so you don’t have to

If using TweetDeck:

  1. Click the + symbol to add a column
  2. Type “#genychat” into the search field. A column will appear as the last column in your TweetDeck
  3. Using the left arrow button, move it next to your Mentions column to better see and respond to your replies while in the chat
  4. Click the Settings button
  5. Click on the Twitter tab
  6. Click on Auto include hashtags when replying
  7. Click Save settings
  8. Reply and ReTweet. TweetDeck puts the hashtag in for you so you don’t have to. (Note: You still have to add “#genychat” onto your own tweets in order for everyone participating to see your tweets)

 

#GenYChat begins at 9pm ET! Get in early for introductions and mingling. See you there!

Leadership and Opportunism in the Social Media Age


What Would a Leader Do?

A word related to your business is trending on Twitter. You have two choices: employ a tactic you’ve already developed for cases such as this, or insert your business, opportunistically, into the Trending Topic. What would a leader do?

 
Your capability as a leader is a measure of your clout, your ability to influence others. If (big if, I know) your Klout score is a measure of your social influence, then a high score should reflect your capability. You have two choices: opportunistically game the system to achieve a high score or allow it to accurately reflect your engagement and influence. What would a leader do?

 
You’re a generational expert; you’re in Human Resources; you’re trying to get a job. A Twitter chat exists that is perfectly suited for your business or personal goals. You have two choices: spam the chat with your pitch or thoughtfully invest time into the chat by building relationships and adding value to the conversation over time. What would a leader do?
 
An article is written suggesting only one generation is qualified for a specific job. You have two choices: be part of the problem or be part of the solution. What would a leader do?

 

What Do Leaders Do?

Saying things such as, “That’s the way it’s always been done. I hope it changes. I doubt it will” is the equivalent of saying someone else needs to take the responsibility for creating the change I’d like to see. Does that sound asinine to you? Now, don’t run to the comments or stop reading here because you think I’ve called you asinine. I haven’t. That statement is asinine; and, we all say foolish things every once in a while, including me. What do leaders do?

 

Be a Leader

The best thing about leaders is that they’re not always looking for ways to embed themselves into conversations that propel their business or personal goals in obvious ways. Leaders see the benefits of long-term engagement.

 

For more than two years #GenYChat has been leading the discussion that seeks to solve the problem of the generation gap every Wednesday at 9pm ET. Do you care enough to be part of the solution even if you aren’t the guest host leading the conversation? Would you rather write a one-off post in response to one person; or, would you rather be part of shaping and adding value to the weekly discussions with many people that seek to better generational ties? It’s true that Millennials can tell when we’re being used to propel business goals. Guess who gave us this insight.

Be a leader.

 

Do you have questions or comments on leadership versus opportunism? You can answer in the comments below or start a conversation with me @WriterChanelle on Twitter.

He said they were just friends, but deep down I knew better.

He said they were just friends, but deep down I knew better.

Sometimes, years later, I wonder why I wasn’t good enough. Even as I type those words, though, I realize I need to be more than just good enough. It hurts. I hurt. My skin hurts. My hands are heavy. My face is streaked with tears.

Mostly I just wonder why and how I felt so strongly for someone whose feelings for me were seemingly non-existent. I let him hurt me. I believed his lies. The pain I feel – this heartbroken sadness – is my fault. For the past two years I’ve sat silently recovering, using music to heal me. Trying to trick myself into thinking I’d moved on, I pushed forward with professional pursuits, suppressing real emotion. The memory couldn’t hurt me if I didn’t allow myself to feel.

We weren’t right for each other. Why did that truth bother me? Because I allowed myself to believe we were. I allowed myself to believe in love. I don’t know if I was listening to my heart or the echoing words in my head, but I was never more sorry that I said, “I love you” to anyone. Whatever part of me it was that guided me to believe I was in love was wrong. Epically wrong.

Ever since I found out the news – on my own because he wasn’t man enough to tell me directly – (I might still be a little bit bitter) I closed up my heart. I opted not to feel. Why should I? Feeling leads to heartbreak. Tonight, though, two years later, the thoughts and feelings and emotions are all coming back to me and it’s taking everything in my power not to ball myself up into the fetal position, turn off the lights, and not do a thing for anyone until the pain subsides. What hurts the most is that he doesn’t care that he hurt me – twice.

 

I believed in you twice; and, you hurt me both times.

 

What is clear is that I shouldn’t have feelings for someone who has the capacity to treat me that way. There was no way for me to know tha…well, maybe there were signs, and I just missed them. I did excuse plenty of bad behavior. So, I’m back to my previous statement. It’s my fault. The question is: How do I make sure I don’t make the same mistake again?

Can We #FixYoungAmerica? – @GenYJen from @theYEC guest hosts #GenYChat on Unemployment

Questions

Q1. What is the greatest challenge for young people entering the workforce? #GenYChat
Q2. If you could give career advice to a college freshman, what would you say? #GenYChat
Q3. Name one or more person(s) on Twitter who work to inspire young careerists. #GenYChat
Q4. Is it naive to think that entrepreneurship is a solution to traditional employment options? Why or why not? #GenYChat
Q5. Programs that aid startups exist. What are reasons for not starting your own? What are excuses? #GenYChat
Q6. What can entrepreneurship classes do to solve the problem of youth unemployment? #GenYChat
Q7. What do you know now about career development that you wish higher ed classes taught? #GenYChat
Q8. What do established workers feel young people don’t understand about the workplace? #GenYChat
Q9. What problems do young people entering the workforce face that older generations don’t understand? #GenYChat
Q10. What can the government do to aid young professionals entering the workforce? #GenYChat

Guest Host

Jennifer Edwards, Community Manager for theYEC, will serve as guest host on a special #GenYChat dedicated to the cause of finding solutions to Youth Unemployment. The YEC has begun a campaign to #FixYoungAmerica.

  • The only way to 100% job security is to create your own job
  • Student loan forgiveness for entrepreneurs
  • Multiple entrepreneurship hubs around the US
  • Students need to graduate with skills
  • Crowd-funding bill
  • Offer entrepreneurship training to all (including at-risk youth)

 

How to Participate in #GenYChat on Twitter

If you haven’t participated in the chat before, but have insights to share, please do the following to participate:

If using Twitter.com:

  1. Type “#genychat” into the search field
  2. Click “All” on the search results page
  3. Reply and ReTweet but add “#genychat” onto your tweets in order for everyone participating to see your tweets

If using TweetChat:

  1. Sign in through OAuth. (note: Please read this information about using  OAuth to give third party applications access to your account)
  2. Type “genychat” into the search field (The “#” is already provided)
  3. Click Go
  4. Reply and ReTweet. TweetChat puts the hashtag in for you so you don’t have to

If using TweetDeck:

  1. Click the + symbol to add a column
  2. Type “#genychat” into the search field. A column will appear as the last column in your TweetDeck
  3. Using the left arrow button, move it next to your Mentions column to better see and respond to your replies while in the chat
  4. Click the Settings button
  5. Click on the Twitter tab
  6. Click on Auto include hashtags when replying
  7. Click Save settings
  8. Reply and ReTweet. TweetDeck puts the hashtag in for you so you don’t have to. (Note: You still have to add “#genychat” onto your own tweets in order for everyone participating to see your tweets)

 

#GenYChat begins at 9pm ET! Get in early for introductions and mingling. See you there!

 

Building A Sustainable Business – Leap Day #GenYChat Topic Featuring @CathyWebSavvyPR

Word of Mouth Marketing

The Path to Sustainable Business Growth

 Questions

Q1. Is passion enough to create a sustainable business model? What other pieces need to be in place?

Q2. What are the key components of a unique selling proposition?

Q3. What advice has helped you keep a (or your client’s) “pipeline” full of customers?

Q4. How can we balance benefiting society while maintaining/driving profit?

Q5. How do you identify revenue bearing business opportunities?

Q6.  You’re asked to identify a strategy to drive new leads while maintaining existing quality of work. What do you include?

Q7. In this economy, virtual teams of solopreneurs is becoming a viable biz model. How do you find team members?

Q8. How do you build relationships with trusted advisors who redflag business issues/encourage growth in different areas?

Q9. You notice that one strategy works well for your competition. Do you follow their model or remain aligned to current strategy?

Q10. How can social media enhance your ability to “show” rather than “tell” what your business is about?

 

Guest Host

Cathy Larkin is the founder of Web Savvy PR, and adds social media tools to the traditional Public Relations (PR) toolkit to help small businesses and entrepreneurs; non-profits; and speakers, bloggers, and authors build their businesses, and expand the reach of their brand.

I started my boutique PR firm in 2005, and in 2007 I attended several conferences and let my inner “Geek Girl” out of the closet and have not looked back. I’ve  steeped myself in social networking, social media, web 2.0, organic search optimization (SEO), blog design, social bookmarking, and I am always learning new things. With 20 plus years of Public Relations (PR) experience behind me, an avid curiosity about technology, and love of connecting people to cool things, I’m having a blast as a social media guide, consultant and speaker.Cathy Larkin 

 

How to Participate in #GenYChat on Twitter

If you haven’t participated in the chat before, but have insights to share, please do the following to participate:

If using Twitter.com:

  1. Type “#genychat” into the search field
  2. Reply and ReTweet but add “#genychat” onto your tweets in order for everyone participating to see your tweets

If using TweetChat:

  1. Sign in through OAuth. (note: Please read this information about using  OAuth to give third party applications access to your account)
  2. Type “genychat” into the search field (The “#” is already provided)
  3. Click Go
  4. Reply and ReTweet. TweetChat puts the hashtag in for you so you don’t have to

If using TweetDeck:

  1. Click the + symbol to add a column
  2. Type “#genychat” into the search field. A column will appear as the last column in your TweetDeck
  3. Using the left arrow button, move it next to your Mentions column to better see and respond to your replies while in the chat
  4. Click the Settings button
  5. Click on the Twitter tab
  6. Click on Auto include hashtags when replying
  7. Click Save settings
  8. Reply and ReTweet. TweetDeck puts the hashtag in for you so you don’t have to. (Note: You still have to add “#genychat” onto your own tweets in order for everyone participating to see your tweets)

 

#GenYChat begins at 9pm ET! Get in early for introductions and mingling. See you there!

 

 

Attend the Premiere Screening of “Walk With Me” at the Arena Stage

Margaret Mead said, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”

Four years ago Tanisha Christie and Ellie Walton started on the path to creating a documentary fraught with inspiring tales of thoughtful, committed citizens who believed in their power to create change.

On Thursday, February 2, 2012 the completed project, “Walk With Me”, will have its first screening at the Arena Stage in Washington, DC at 8pm.

Against the backdrop of historical moments of social change, “Walk With Me” is an expressionistic documentary that follows three women who use theater to inspire, stir and animate our democracy. Journeying with them while they work in prisons, community centers and schools, we see how theater can ask and answer critical questions: How do we fight injustice? How do we reclaim our personal and collective history? And, how do we inspire positive change in each other? “Walk With Me” shares that the personal creative act is a political one revealing that one person – one artist – can make a difference.

This may be the first screening of this film, but these two ladies are not newcomers to this world. Ellie Walton recently received the Mayor’s Arts Award for Outstanding Achievement in Arts within the Washington, DC community. Tanisha Christie spent many years in the Washington, DC community as an actor-educator-director. She was formerly the Assistant Director at DC’s Living Stage Theater Company/Arena Stage.  She now lives in New York. Both were inspired to make this film by their mentor, the late Rebecca Rice who is featured in the film.

Check out the “Walk With Me” trailer

Walk With Me Teaser from Ellie Walton on Vimeo.

Suggested ticket price is $20 but no one will be turned away. Please pay what you can.
Seats are limited, so please RSVP here to reserve a seat: ayaartsandmedia@gmail.com

Q & A will follow the screening.

The Mead Center for American Theater (Arena Stage) is located at 1101 6th Street, SW, Washington, DC 20024 or the Waterfront-SEU Station on the Green Line.

“I Hate My Teenage Daughter”: A New Normal?

“I Hate My Teenage Daughter”, a new Fox sitcom, tells the story of two popular teenage daughters being raised by two mothers who were unpopular in high school and their husbands.

Nikki Miller, one of the mothers, represses what are presumably her feelings of low self-worth – feelings that make her feel inferior to her daughter – by eating. She was supposedly, “cured” of these feelings, feelings for which she was teased mercilessly while growing up.

A sample of dialogue from the show:

“Honey, please don’t be mad at me. I hate it when you shut me out. Can’t we just go back to being best friends?”

“We were never best friends.”

“It’s okay. I know you didn’t mean that.”

It’s normal to hate our mothers, right?

In the pilot the two daughters are punished by their mothers for leaving a wheelchair-bound classmate in a locked closet. Meanwhile, their fathers, seeking peace with their daughters, pay them each $100 to stop being angry with them.

The show approaches its end with a tender moment from Annie Watson, the other mother, to her daughter, Sophie. Sophie’s apology leads the audience to believe the cause of their argument was a moment of failed communication where the mothers punished their children without listening to their daughters’ side of the story. Both mothers lift the punishment.

The audience, now ready for a touching moment showing the daughters’ complexity and exposing them as well intentioned, are instead shown that the girls are, in fact, liars. Years of family sitcoms with tender teaching moments offered at show’s end might have trained our minds to expect and accept these endings. The show, in fact, ends with a realization that the daughters lied to have their punishments waived. Not only did they lie, but they also blamed their plight on hurtful comments received from the supposedly racist wheelchair-ridden student. Nikki, a Caucasian woman, is raising a biracial daughter, MacKenzie, the product of an interracial marriage now dissolving in divorce.

Instead of portraying the daughters as having the ability or the desire to grow and become better, they are portrayed as manipulative bullies who repeat the negative behaviors learned in their homes with their peers at school. Upon realizing the truth, that the wheelchair bound classmate is African-American and did not make racist statements, Annie notes they might simply have horrible daughters.

Is It Normal to Hate Your Daughter?

As a GenY-er I wanted to be on the side of the daughters prior to watching this show based solely on its title. I cannot support their behavior. This show highlights one kind of young person, an individual that does not represent the broad and diverse spectrum of today’s youth. Daughters have long hated their mothers; it’s part of youthful rebellion. Is “I Hate My Teenage Daughter” creating a new normal in hating the daughter right back, publicly? Is there a possible lesson to be learned that will be revealed in time?

The title of this show leaves much to be desired. Given its popularity, though, the show might not be going anywhere for a while. In December it won its Wednesday 9:30-10pm time period among Teens and Men 18-34 and ranks #2 among Adults 18-49 and Adults 18-34. The ratings show the unpopularity of this show among women, perhaps driven by its title. What is drawing teenagers and men to the show? Is this entertainment?

Broadcaster Tavis Smiley to Lead Conversation on #RemakingAmerica


An article written recently by Forbes contributor Gene Marks was shared over 90,000 times, garnering attention for its, seemingly, purposely sensationalist headline. Out of the thousands of ensuing comments a theme emerged: His error was in making the piece about race when it should have been about class. What this article achieved was to highlight the ignorance of the experience of poverty held by the inexperienced. Poverty is still an issue. In 2012. Across the world.

In an effort to call more attention to and find a solution for this crisis, Tavis Smiley, host of Tavis Smiley on PBS, The Tavis Smiley Show and co-host of Smiley & West from PRI, (Public Radio International) and a panel of prolific thought leaders and advocates will convene in Washington, DC on January 12, 2012 from 6:30pm – 9pm ET for “Remaking America: From Poverty to Prosperity.”

This symposium will discuss solutions for restoring America’s prosperity and dissect the findings from a recently released White Paper from Indiana University on ‘the new face of the poor.’ Remaking America” will feature a list of distinguished influencers from political, finance, film and economic communities including: Cornel West, Princeton professor and author; Suze Orman, America’s leading authority on personal finance; Michael Moore, Academy Award®-winning filmmaker; Barbara Ehrenreich, author of Nickel and Dimed; Jeffrey Sachs, poverty expert and Professor of Health Policy and Management at Columbia University; Majora Carter, Urban Revitalization Strategist; Vicki B. Escarra, President and CEO of Feeding America and others!

WHERE:             George Washington University Lisner Auditorium 730 21st St. NW, Washington, DC 20052

 

ADMISSION: FREE TO THE PUBLIC on a first-come, first-served basis. Doors open at 5 p.m. Self-parking is available on site. All attendees must register at www.TAVISTALKS.com/REMAKINGAMERICA

To participate on Twitter, follow the hashtag: #RemakingAmerica

 

Generation Y: Welcome Back Home?

The following is a guest post by Cristin McGrath.

 

I’ve always been proud of my independence and ambition.  I never thought I’d consider moving back home.  My senior year of high school was the last time I lived with my parents for more than a few days.  As of August I’m back for a return engagement.

Society has attached a nasty stigma to the notion of adult children living with their parents.  After college it seemed most of my friends flew right back to their comfy, cheap nests when the job market was still poor, when their dream firms didn’t extend offers, when their chosen fields and expected salaries didn’t materialize.  I, on the other, less frugal hand, took an internship that didn’t pay me nearly enough to afford my studio apartment in West Philadelphia (or life alone, in general).  While I was technically living under the poverty line, I saw stars – literally and figuratively – during my stint as an intern with the Philadelphia Eagles.  The brand recognition I earned from working with a professional sports team was too impressive to pass up.

After the internship’s honeymoon phase wore off, I realized student loans didn’t care about brand recognition and whether or not I saw literal or figurative stars.  My loan obligations were steadily piling up while I earned less as a literal and figurative star-seeing intern than a Burger King cashier.  Something didn’t add up. I decided enough was enough and began the stressful and disheartening task of finding a new job. The figurative stars later aligned perfectly as a contact I met via Twitter told me of an opening with an agency. I’d finally found a new job and a spot above the poverty line.

Three unpaid college internships and countless student loans did their damage, however.  My new salary and benefits still don’t allow me to save money and continue with my lifestyle, already something less than extravagant.  Asking my parents for help was the last thing I wanted to do, as my independence has always been important to me.  Fortunately, they both recognized my struggle with poverty-ridden pride and offered the move home as a temporary solution (the “temporary” is my addition).

I have established a January 1, 2012 deadline to move out (again), to reestablish my independence.  By then I will have a nest egg and be ready to kick myself out of my parents’ nest.  A timeline for my departure is the only way I can mentally prepare myself for my return to the nest. I wanted to do it all on my own, and will, but us GenY’ers must know when our time in the wild has proven too dangerous to continue alone.  The global economy is in distress.  Debt – the country’s, our parents’, ours – is threatening our ability to take flight.  So don’t be discouraged if the nest beckons.  It’s warm and welcoming there.

 

The preceding was a guest post by Cristin McGrath.

Cristin McGrath is a creative and passionate communications specialist with experience across both traditional and emerging media. Her young but vibrant career has focused on building brand images for impressive organizations across the music, entertainment, technology, and sports industries — her expertise in the fields of social media and events management has enabled her to successfully aid in the operation of press departments with the Philadelphia Eagles, Sony Music Entertainment, MTV Networks and Dell.  Most recently, she has transitioned into the world of agency PR with Vault Communications.

Cristin graduated in 2010 from Temple University with a BA in Strategic and Organizational Communication. She will be living (temporarily, of course) in the Poconos with her parents until January 2012.

What’s the ROI on that Degree Now?

The following is a guest post by Liz Funk (bio below)

We’ve all felt buyer’s remorse.  That lime green sundress that looked great in the fitting room looks putrid in the natural light.  You decide to splurge on a dinner out, ordering an $18 entrée. When you finally eat it, it’s good, but not $18-good.  You buy a bag of clearance clothes from the Gap, get home and deeply resent spending $60 on non-refundable clothes.  It happens to everyone, every now and then, and you move on, because hopefully your buyer’s remorse isn’t on items worth more than a few hours’ pay.

But, what if you have buyer’s remorse for a major investment you made that will take years of income to pay off? And, without the resources to pay off such an investment, it seems like it was a terrible idea?

The “crap economy” and the devastating impact that the 2008 economic crash has had on young people has caused widespread unemployment among 20somethings.  Because young people don’t have jobs, a) many young people don’t have the money to repay their student loans, and b) many young people are wondering why they went to college in the first place, if they’re unemployed!

While some “quarterlifers” miss college and want to go back to a simpler time, others are thoroughly resenting their college experience.  Here’s how to reconcile this:

How to find value in your degree

1) First and foremost, be nice to yourself.  Before 2006, there were relatively few people who had an idea that the economy was going to go so far downhill, and odds are good that you weren’t one of them.  There’s nothing you can do to change the fact that you did go to college (i.e. a time machine), so be compassionate and nice to yourself and don’t beat yourself up.

2) Write down everything positive that you got out of college, whether it was a few really good friends who you still keep in touch with, some awesome memories (write each of them down!), or classes where you read some life-changing books.

3) Be critical of the system.  There is definitely something messed up in that our society encourages entering college seniors to take out loans to go to the best college they were accepted to, but many take out a Range Rover’s worth of student loans, picking majors that will not help them pay off these loans.  This isn’t to say that you should major in engineering if you aren’t interested in it. Rather, we should encourage students to consider alternate paths. Rather than rushing from high school straight into college, students should consider taking a gap year or two to work, travel, or intern so they have a stronger sense of what they might want to do professionally.  Then, if they do take out student loans, they’ll be investing in an education that will help them pursue their passions, rather than going to college because that’s what you’re supposed to do, without much of an endpoint short of graduating.  On that note, give yourself a break from job hunting, worrying, and stressing.  This will ensure that you have some mental and emotional energy to brainstorm both where you want to go from here and how you can tap into what you learned in college to help you carve out a career!

But, overall, be nice to yourself because you can only move forward to a place that’s more positive if you’re really rooting and advocating for yourself!

 

Your turn! How do you come into your own when the first years of your adult life are marked by joblessness, instability, angst, and incessant money problems?

 

Coming of Age in a Crap Economy is the brainchild of Liz Funk, a New York-based freelance writer, author, and college lecturer. Liz has written for USA Today, Newsday, the Washington Post, New York magazine, the Christian Science Monitor, CosmoGIRL!, Girls’ Life, the Baltimore Sun, the New Jersey Record, the Albany Times Union, Lemondrop.com (AOL), and the New Humanist (UK). She is the author of Supergirls Speak Out: Inside the Secret Crisis of Overachieving Girls, a non-fiction look at how today’s young women feel that they must be constantly improving themselves if they want to be loved. She regularly speaks at colleges about how young women can overcome perfectionism and about breaking into journalism/publishing, and she has been a guest lecturer at Columbia University, Cornell University, Duke University, New York University, Boston University, Emerson College, Rice University, Whitman College, the University of Iowa, the University of Missouri, Mississippi State University, the University of South Florida, and Penn State University, among many other colleges.

She graduated from college in 2009 with high honors in English literature and has yet to be extended a single full-time job offer. She lives in upstate New York with her collie, Buddy (who she’s pretty sure has figured out the meaning of life), and her parents, of course.

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